How to Course in Perfect Wisdom

There is a piece of you that is not a piece– it is a whole– but, as a whole, it is untouchable, unknowable, unspeakable. The Bodhisattva that courses in Perfect Wisdom has this untouchable, unknowable, unspeakable as her refuge.

Inscrutable

There is a mantra,
it is the most helpful mantra for me today,
it came to me on a long walk,
maybe you will enjoy taking it up:

I am not what I think I am.
You are not what I think you are.
We are not what I think we are.
They are not what I think they are.
It is not what I think it is.

I then continue through all possible knowable categories of relation (that I can remember at the time) and I gently remind myself that they are not what I think they are.

I am of the nature to over-intellectualize things. This mantra helps me to calm down when nothing else helps. I gently remind myself that the hells I concoct are not actually, inherently, existent.

Not listed above, but sometimes included in my chanting of this mantra, are the following categories:

  • This,
  • that,
  • not-I,
  • not-you,
  • not-we,
  • not-they,
  • not-it,
  • not-this

all of these are not what I think they are.

Not Void

While they are not what I think they are, they are also *not* void.

If it were this easy there would be no reason to course in the Perfection of Wisdom.
If voidness were the answer,
there would be no big deal.
But,
voidness is not the answer–
just as we Bodhisattvas who course in Perfect Wisdom do not cling to notions of the substantiality of things and beings,
we also do not cling to the nonsubstantiality of things and beings.

Things and beings neither are, nor are they not. 

Bodhisattvas who course in Perfect Wisdom see another option.

notWhatIThink

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