Here is a description of the meanings of various Sanskrit syllables, from a text called “The Large Sutra on Perfect Wisdom” (translated by Conze). Our author describes the meaning of various Sanksrit syllables in the context of this Pranjnaparamita Tradition. Some of my Buddhist friends pay close attention to the practice of Mantra Recitation. So, for their benefit (and my own), I share this section of the Large Sutra on Perfect Wisdom along with some basic information about Sanksrit pronunciation..

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The task is huge. Beginningless eternity is a long time and infinity is a big number. Without good buddies, we’ll get confused, we’ll get lost, we’ll suffer more than we need to.

In the Lankavatara Sutra, we learn about two kinds of ego-delusion. In the Anatta-lakkhana Sutta, we get a nice tidy teaching on notSelf. I’m going to bring together a few things from both of these writings and hopefully tie ’em together in a way that helps you see the bigger picture.

Buddhaghosa, in the Visuddhimagga, discusses the Divine Ear Element. In the Śūraṅgama Sūtra we see Avalokiteśvara describe the practice of perfect listening. We also see Manjusri Bodhisattva praise and recommend Avalokiteśvara’s practice of perfect listening. Reading this morning, I noticed how these two connect and I want to share it with all of you.

I recommend printing these out and looking more closely.

Train of thought from a sick Buddhist. I’m just rambling about the things I’ve been reading and the thoughts I’ve been having in relation to my illness (Type 1 Diabetes). It starts off with thinking about diabetes, but ends with thinking about thinking. Minding mind. Check it out!

A Bodhisattva won’t argue! Though a Bodhisattva does share her wisdom, she will not engage in petty quarreling. I can’t express it any more clearly than the masters of yore, so I’m just going to share this piece of this Prajnaparamita Sutra called “Perfect Wisdom in 8,000 Lines”.