We are on a quest to display the Buddha’s teachings on anger. Many people today take many positions on what we are to do– ranging from complete embrace and acceptance of all the range of human emotion, to an ascetic rejection of all things that might rustle up any emotion– but the Buddha gave a clear teaching that Buddhist people follow. In this installment, we’ll address some misconceptions, look at what the Buddha advises in the Brahmajala Sutta and then we’ll briefly point to what happens to the brain on anger.

Here is a description of the meanings of various Sanskrit syllables, from a text called “The Large Sutra on Perfect Wisdom” (translated by Conze). Our author describes the meaning of various Sanksrit syllables in the context of this Pranjnaparamita Tradition. Some of my Buddhist friends pay close attention to the practice of Mantra Recitation. So, for their benefit (and my own), I share this section of the Large Sutra on Perfect Wisdom along with some basic information about Sanksrit pronunciation..

In the Lankavatara Sutra, we learn about two kinds of ego-delusion. In the Anatta-lakkhana Sutta, we get a nice tidy teaching on notSelf. I’m going to bring together a few things from both of these writings and hopefully tie ’em together in a way that helps you see the bigger picture.