We are on a quest to display the Buddha’s teachings on anger. Many people today take many positions on what we are to do– ranging from complete embrace and acceptance of all the range of human emotion, to an ascetic rejection of all things that might rustle up any emotion– but the Buddha gave a clear teaching that Buddhist people follow. In this installment, we’ll address some misconceptions, look at what the Buddha advises in the Brahmajala Sutta and then we’ll briefly point to what happens to the brain on anger.

Train of thought from a sick Buddhist. I’m just rambling about the things I’ve been reading and the thoughts I’ve been having in relation to my illness (Type 1 Diabetes). It starts off with thinking about diabetes, but ends with thinking about thinking. Minding mind. Check it out!

There is the practice of the Ten Recollections. One of these recollections is ‘Recollection of the Tathagata’. Here, in this most wonderful Mahayana text, the Vimalakirti Sutra, we hear about how Vimalakirti sees the Buddha as being of the same nature as his own true, or “ultimate” (paramārtha) nature.